The Elderly And The Flu

The flue and the elderly   Cause, treatment, and prevention
The flu and the elderly Cause, treatment, and prevention

The year 2020 has been a terrible year for everybody and especially for the elderly regarding the virus COVID 19 but normally the flu seasons are also devastating even though there are flu shots that are available.

So  in this post, I will be looking at the  flu and the elderly population

What is the flu?

The flu (influenza) is a seasonal virus that causes mild to severe symptoms. Some people recover in about a week, while others can be at risk of serious, life-threatening complications. There are many strains of the virus

The risk of complications increases if you’re over the age of 65. Older adults tend to have a weaker immune system, which naturally occurs as we age. And when your immune system isn’t strong, it becomes harder for the body to fight off a virus.

Continue reading “The Elderly And The Flu”

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Kidney Disease — Diabetic Insipidus

Diabetes Disease /  Diabetes Insipidus   Symptoms and Cause
Diabetes Disease / Diabetes Insipidus Symptoms and Cause

 

In this post, we are taking a look at a rear type of disease that affects the kidneys. While there is no known cure for this disease, there are medicines that can help to manage the symptoms.

What Is Diabetes Insipidus?

Diabetes insipidus is a rare condition that causes your body to make a lot of urine that is “insipid,” or colorless, and odorless. Most people pee out 1 to 2 quarts a day. People with diabetes insipidus can pass between 3 and 20 quarts a day.

Diabetes Insipidus vs. Diabetes Mellitus

Diabetes insipidus is a different disease from diabetes mellitus. These two diseases names may be similar, but the only things they have in common is that they make you thirsty and make you pee a lot.

If you have diabetes insipidus, the hormones that help your body balance liquids don’t work. It is a very rear disease. Only one in every 25,000 people gets this condition.

With diabetes mellitus (often shortened to “diabetes”), your body can’t use energy from food as it should. It’s far more common. Around 100 million Americans have type 1 or type 2 diabetes.

Symptoms of Diabetes Insipidus

Symptoms include:

  • Severe thirst
  • Peeing a lot (your doctor might call this polyuria)
  • Getting up to go a lot at night
  • Preference for cold drinks
  • Dehydration
  • Weakness
  • Muscle pains
  • Irritability

Dehydration is another symptom. You might notice:

  • Fatigue
  • Feeling sluggish
  • Dizziness
  • Confusion
  • Nausea

Symptoms in Infants and Children

Many of the symptoms are similar to younger people. In infants, watch for:

  • Crankiness
  • Slow growth
  • Poor feeding

In children, signs include:

  • Drinking a lot of water
  • Peeing often, sometimes every hour
  • New bedwetting or waking during the night to pee
  • Dehydration

The types of diabetes insipidus.

The types of diabetes insipidus include

  • central
  • nephrogenic
  • dipsogenic
  • gestational

Causes

Diabetes insipidus occurs when your body can’t properly balance the body’s fluid levels.

When your fluid regulation system is working properly, your kidneys help maintain this balance. The kidneys remove fluids from your bloodstream. This fluid waste is temporarily stored in your bladder as urine until you urinate. The body can also rid itself of excess fluids through sweating, breathing, or diarrhea.

A hormone called anti-diuretic hormone (ADH), or vasopressin, helps control how fast or slow fluids are excreted. ADH is made in a part of the brain called the hypothalamus and stored in the pituitary gland, a small gland found in the base of the brain.

If you have diabetes insipidus, your body can’t properly balance fluid levels. The cause varies depending on the type of diabetes insipidus you have:

  • Central diabetes insipidus. Damage to the pituitary gland or hypothalamus from surgery, a tumor, a head injury, or an illness can cause central diabetes insipidus by affecting the usual production, storage, and release of ADH. An inherited genetic disease can also cause this condition.
  • Nephrogenic diabetes insipidus. Nephrogenic diabetes insipidus occurs when there’s a defect in the kidney tubules — the structures in your kidneys that cause water to be excreted or reabsorbed. This defect makes your kidneys unable to respond to ADH appropriately.

The defect may be due to an inherited (genetic) disorder or a chronic kidney disorder. Certain drugs, such as lithium or antiviral medications such as foscarnet (Foscavir), also can cause nephrogenic diabetes insipidus.

  • Gestational diabetes insipidus. Gestational diabetes insipidus is rare. It occurs only during pregnancy when an enzyme made by the placenta destroys ADH in the mother.

Primary polydipsia. Also known as dipsogenic diabetes insipidus, this condition can cause the production of large amounts of diluted urine. The underlying cause is drinking an excessive amount of fluids.

Primary polydipsia can be caused by damage to the thirst-regulating mechanism in the hypothalamus.

  • The condition has also been linked to mental illness, such as schizophrenia.

Sometimes, there’s no known cause of diabetes insipidus. However, in some people, the disorder may be the result of an autoimmune reaction that causes the immune system to damage the cells that make vasopressin.

Risk factors

Nephrogenic diabetes insipidus that is present at or shortly after birth is usually an inherited (genetic) condition that permanently changes the kidneys’ ability to concentrate the urine. Nephrogenic diabetes insipidus usually affects males, though women can pass the gene on to their children.

Complications

Dehydration

Diabetes insipidus may lead to dehydration. Dehydration can cause:

  • Dry mouth
  • Changes in skin elasticity
  • Thirst
  • Fatigue

Electrolyte imbalance

Diabetes insipidus can cause an imbalance in electrolytes — minerals in your blood, such as sodium and potassium, that maintain the fluid balance in your body. Symptoms of an electrolyte imbalance may include:

  • Weakness
  • Nausea
  • Vomiting
  • Loss of appetite
  • Muscle cramps
  • Confusion

How is diabetes insipidus diagnosed?

A health care provider can diagnose a person with diabetes insipidus based on the following:

  • medical and family history
  • physical exam
  • urinalysis
  • blood tests
  • fluid deprivation test
  • magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)

How is diabetes insipidus treated?

The primary treatment for diabetes insipidus involves drinking enough liquid to prevent dehydration. A health care provider may refer a person with diabetes insipidus to a nephrologist—(a doctor who specializes in treating kidney problems)—or to an endocrinologist—(a doctor who specializes in treating disorders of the hormone-producing glands). Treatment for frequent urination or constant thirst depends on the patient’s type of diabetes insipidus:

Researchers have not found that eating, diet, and nutrition play a role in causing or preventing diabetes insipidus.

Can diabetes insipidus be prevented or avoided?

Unfortunately, in most cases, diabetes insipidus is a permanent condition. You likely won’t be able to prevent it.

This condition is more often associated with another health problem. It can be associated with abnormal kidney function or tumors.

Even though you can’t prevent it in these cases, you can often manage the symptoms.

Living with diabetes insipidus

There is no cure for diabetes insipidus. But you can work with your doctor to manage the symptoms of this condition.

Medicine can help prevent constant thirst and excessive urination that comes with this condition. Preventing these symptoms will add a great deal to your quality of life.

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Hepatitis C Among Boomers

Hepatitis C,  among boomers  Why, is the infection risk higher for Baby Boomers?
Hepatitis C,  among boomers Why, is the infection risk higher for Baby Boomers?

In this post, I am taking a look at Hepatitis C,  among boomers. In doing my research for this post I discovered a few facts that surprised me.

In this post, I will be looking at hepatitis C and the Boomer Generation This Viral Disease Poses a Problem for Boomers.

Hepatitis C is a viral infection that causes liver inflammation, sometimes leading to serious liver damage. The hepatitis C virus (HCV) spreads through contaminated blood.

Hepatitis C infection is caused by the hepatitis C virus (HCV). The infection spreads when blood contaminated with the virus enters the bloodstream of an uninfected person.

Globally, HCV exists in several distinct forms, known as genotypes. Seven distinct HCV genotypes and more than 67 subtypes have been identified. The most common HCV genotype in the United States is type 1.

Although chronic hepatitis C follows a similar course regardless of the genotype of the hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection causes acute hepatitis C, which may progress to chronic hepatitis C. Many people with hepatitis C do not show symptoms until severe liver damage. If it is not treated, chronic hepatitis C can cause life-threatening liver disease.1,2

Unfortunately, about 60 percent of people in the U.S. with hepatitis C know they have it. This means access to testing limits our ability to address hepatitis C.3

Chronic hepatitis C has been most common among people born between 1945 and 1965 (Baby Boomers). Now, because of the opioid crisis, new HCV infections are occurring more in people born between 1981 and 1996 (Millennials).

To address this, the CDC and other organizations now recommend that all adults should get tested for hepatitis C at least once. They also recommend that people with ongoing risk factors get tested regularly.

Are Baby Boomers at a higher risk for infection?

A CDC report in 2012 showed that about 1 in 30 Baby Boomers were infected with HCV. This infection rate was 5 times higher than for other generations. And Baby Boomers made up about 75 percent of all chronic HCV infections among U.S. adults.1,4

The CDC then recommended Hepatitis C screening for all Baby Boomers. This helped identify more chronic hepatitis C cases than the previous guidelines, which were based only on risk factors. However, the hepatitis C epidemic has changed since 2012. Because of increased injection drug use, new HCV infections are more common in young adults. According to a CDC study in 2018, Millennials and Baby Boomers each make up 36 percent of new chronic hepatitis C infections. People born between 1966 and 1980 (Generation X) make up about 23 percent of new infections.2,5

Hepatitis C is still a concern for Baby Boomers because of their individual risk factors. But the opioid crisis is also increasing the risk for all generations.

Why is the infection risk higher for Baby Boomers?

We do not know why Baby Boomers have a higher risk of HCV infection. Some studies suggest that they were more exposed to injection drug use during young adulthood in the 1970s and 1980s.1 Also, many Baby Boomers may have been infected by blood transfusions before we began screening the blood supply in 1992. It is also possible that HCV infections were more common because of poor medical practices at the time.6,7

Other studies also show that lack of health insurance, use of alcohol, and service in Vietnam may have contributed to the higher infection risk. Most Baby Boomers with chronic hepatitis C will not know how they were infected.4,8

What are the current testing recommendations for Baby Boomers?

The CDC now recommends testing for:5

  • Every adult at least once
  • Pregnant women during every pregnancy
  • Everyone with current risk factors regularly

Risk factors include injection drug use, sharing drug preparation equipment, and certain medical conditions. Talk to your doctor to discuss your risk factors and how often you should get tested.9

Testing is especially important for Baby Boomers. Living longer with chronic hepatitis C increases the chances of serious liver disease. Testing can help you get treated quicker.7

If you and your doctor decide you should be tested, you may first take an FDA-approved test for a hepatitis C antibody. A positive test means you were exposed to the virus. Either you have an active infection or you fought off a previous infection. You would then take an FDA-approved test for HCV RNA. If this test is positive, it means you have an active hepatitis C infection.9

Your doctor can give you more information specific to your situation. They can help you get tested, advise you on precautions to take, and help get treatment if it is needed.

Why Get Tested?

Hepatitis C is a silent disease. Three out of four people who’ve been infected don’t know they have it.

A blood test is the only way to find out if you’ve been infected before the virus causes serious health problems. If your test shows you have it, antiviral drugs can cure it in most cases and prevent future issues.

“It’s so sad when we see patients who have been unknowingly infected for many years and come in with cirrhosis, cancer, or liver failure,” says Sammy Saab, MD, professor of medicine and surgery at UCLA.

Standard STD Test for Women - Check for HIV, Hepatitis C, Syphilis, Herpes Simplex Type 2, Chlamydia, Gonorrhea, Trichomoniasis - Verisana
Standard STD Test for Women – Check for HIV, Hepatitis C, Syphilis, Herpes Simplex Type 2, Chlamydia, Gonorrhea, Trichomoniasis – Verisana

Understanding Your Hep C Risk

Baby boomers’ chances of having hepatitis C are higher in part because they could have been exposed to it through IV drug use or unprotected sex before the virus was known about or anyone was being tested for it.

Some also could have gotten it through a blood transfusion or organ transplant before widespread screening of the blood supply began in 1992.

While it was once uncommon among younger people, their odds of having it has risen sharply in recent years. One reason for that could be the increase in IV drug use caused by the growing opioid problem.

Seventy-three percent of those surveyed correctly said that all baby boomers should be tested, but nearly three-quarters of survey respondents between the ages of 18 and 38 didn’t think they were at risk.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VNe0SJnWckQ

Symptoms

Long-term infection with the hepatitis C virus is known as chronic hepatitis C. Chronic hepatitis C is usually a “silent” infection for many years, until the virus damages the liver enough to cause the signs and symptoms of liver disease.

Signs and symptoms include:

  • Bleeding easily
  • Bruising easily
  • Fatigue
  • Poor appetite
  • Yellow discoloration of the skin and eyes (jaundice)
  • Dark-colored urine
  • Itchy skin
  • Fluid buildup in your abdomen (ascites)
  • Swelling in your legs
  • Weight loss
  • Confusion, drowsiness and slurred speech (hepatic encephalopathy)
  • Spiderlike blood vessels on your skin (spider angiomas)

Every chronic hepatitis C infection starts with an acute phase. Acute hepatitis C usually goes undiagnosed because it rarely causes symptoms. When signs and symptoms are present, they may include jaundice, along with fatigue, nausea, fever, and muscle aches. Acute symptoms appear one to three months after exposure to the virus and the last two weeks to three months.

Acute hepatitis C infection doesn’t always become chronic. Some people clear HCV from their bodies after the acute phase, an outcome is known as spontaneous viral clearance. In studies of people diagnosed with acute HCV, rates of spontaneous viral clearance have varied from 15% to 25%. Acute hepatitis C also responds well to antiviral therapy.

WAGNER Switzerland Air Purifier WA888 HEPA-13 Medical Grade Filter, Particle Sensor for 500 sq.ft. Rooms. Removes Mold, Odors, Smoke, Allergens, Germs and Pet Dander, etc..(Black)
WAGNER Switzerland Air Purifier WA888 HEPA-13 Medical Grade Filter, Particle Sensor for 500 sq.ft. Rooms. Removes Mold, Odors, Smoke, Allergens, Germs and Pet Dander, etc..(Black)

Causes

Hepatitis C infection is caused by the hepatitis C virus (HCV). The infection spreads when blood contaminated with the virus enters the bloodstream of an uninfected person.

Globally, HCV exists in several distinct forms, known as genotypes. Seven distinct HCV genotypes and more than 67 subtypes have been identified. The most common HCV genotype in the United States is type 1.

Although chronic hepatitis C follows a similar course regardless of the genotype of the infecting virus, treatment recommendations vary depending on viral genotype.

Risk factors

Your risk of hepatitis C infection is increased if you:

  • Are a health care worker who has been exposed to infected blood, which may happen if an infected needle pierces your skin
  • Have ever injected or inhaled illicit drugs
  • Have HIV
  • Received a piercing or tattoo in an unclean environment using unsterile equipment
  • Received a blood transfusion or organ transplant before 1992
  • Received clotting factor concentrates before 1987
  • Received hemodialysis treatments for a long period of time
  • Were born to a woman with a hepatitis C infection
  • Were ever in prison
  • Were born between 1945 and 1965, the age group with the highest incidence of hepatitis C infection

Complications

Hepatitis C infection that continues over many years can cause significant complications, such as:

  • Scarring of the liver (cirrhosis). After decades of hepatitis C infection, cirrhosis may occur. Scarring in your liver makes it difficult for your liver to function.
  • Liver cancer. A small number of people with hepatitis C infection may develop liver cancer.
  • Liver failure. Advanced cirrhosis may cause your liver to stop functioning.

Prevention

Protect yourself from hepatitis C infection by taking the following precautions:

  • Stop using illicit drugs, particularly if you inject them. If you use illicit drugs, seek help.
  • Be cautious about body piercing and tattooing. If you choose to undergo piercing or tattooing, look for a reputable shop. Ask questions beforehand about how the equipment is cleaned. Make sure the employees use sterile needles. If employees won’t answer your questions, look for another shop.
  • Practice safer sex. Don’t engage in unprotected sex with multiple partners or with any partner whose health status is uncertain. Sexual transmission between monogamous couples may occur, but the risk is low.

Treatment

Antiviral medications

Hepatitis C infection is treated with antiviral medications intended to clear the virus from your body. The goal of treatment is to have no hepatitis C virus detected in your body at least 12 weeks after you complete treatment.

Researchers have recently made significant advances in treatment for hepatitis C using new, “direct-acting” antiviral medications, sometimes in combination with existing ones. As a result, people experience better outcomes, fewer side effects, and shorter treatment times — some as short as eight weeks. The choice of medications and length of treatment depends on the hepatitis C genotype, presence of existing liver damage, other medical conditions, and prior treatments.

Due to the pace of research, recommendations for medications and treatment regimens are changing rapidly. It is therefore best to discuss your treatment options with a specialist.

Throughout treatment, your care team will monitor your response to medications.

Liver transplantation

If you have developed serious complications from chronic hepatitis C infection, liver transplantation may be an option. During liver transplantation, the surgeon removes your damaged liver and replaces it with a healthy liver. Most transplanted livers come from deceased donors, though a small number come from living donors who donate a portion of their livers.

In most cases, a liver transplant alone doesn’t cure hepatitis C. The infection is likely to return, requiring treatment with antiviral medication to prevent damage to the transplanted liver. Several studies have demonstrated that new, direct-acting antiviral medication regimens are effective at curing post-transplant hepatitis C. At the same time, treatment with direct-acting antivirals can be achieved in appropriately selected patients before liver transplantation.

Vaccinations

Although there is no vaccine for hepatitis C, your doctor will likely recommend that you receive vaccines against hepatitis A and B viruses. These are separate viruses that also can cause liver damage and complicate the course of chronic hepatitis C.

I have left a very easy exercise from Silver Sneakers I hope you enjoy it

The 5-Minute Seated Cardio Blast

Thank you for your time, hope you found the information in this post useful, your comments and questions are welcomed. Please remember to share this post, and stay healthy.

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What is Rheumatoid Arthritis

One of the many ailments that affect us as we age is arthritis, there are many different  types of arthritis in this post I will be looking at one of them, rheumatoid arthritis

There are different types of arthritis up to 100 types, but the most common are rheumatoid arthritis, osteoarthritis, and septic arthritis.

Rheumatoid arthritis is the most common type of arthritis and it is an autoimmune disease that affects that 1% of the whole earth population, which is equivalent to over 75 million people, which are suffering from this disease which are suffering from this disease. It is chronic, which means long-lasting disease with intermittent periods of remission and exacerbation. https://betahealthy.com/

What is rheumatoid arthritis

Rheumatoid arthritis

Rheumatoid arthritis is a long-term autoimmune disorder that primarily affects joints. It typically results in warm, swollen, and painful joints. Pain and stiffness often worsen following rest. Most commonly, the wrist and hands are involved, with the same joints typically involved on both sides of the body.Wikipedia

What are the symptoms of rheumatoid arthritis

https://www.mayoclinic.org/

Symptoms

Signs and symptoms of rheumatoid arthritis may include:

  • Tender, warm, swollen joints
  • Joint stiffness that is usually worse in the mornings and after inactivity
  • Fatigue, fever and loss of appetite

Early rheumatoid arthritis tends to affect your smaller joints first — particularly the joints that attach your fingers to your hands and your toes to your feet.

As the disease progresses, symptoms often spread to the wrists, knees, ankles, elbows, hips and shoulders. In most cases, symptoms occur in the same joints on both sides of your body.

About 40 percent of the people who have rheumatoid arthritis also experience signs and symptoms that don’t involve the joints. Rheumatoid arthritis can affect many non joint structures, including:

  • Skin
  • Eyes
  • Lungs
  • Heart
  • Kidneys
  • Salivary glands
  • Nerve tissue
  • Bone marrow
  • Blood vessels

Rheumatoid arthritis signs and symptoms may vary in severity and may even come and go.

Periods of increased disease activity, called flares, alternate with periods of relative remission — when the swelling and pain fade or disappear. Over time, rheumatoid arthritis can cause joints to deform and shift out of place.

How does rheumatoid arthritis affect your body https://www.healthline.com/

Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is more than just joint pain. This chronic inflammatory autoimmune disease causes your body to mistakenly attack healthy joints and leads to widespread inflammation.

While RA is notorious for causing joint pain and inflammation, it can also cause other symptoms throughout the body.

RA is a progressive autoimmune disease that mainly affects your joints. According to the Arthritis Foundation, about 1.5 million U.S. people live with RA.

Anyone can get RA, but it generally begins between the ages of 30 and 60. It also tends to affect women nearly three times more than men.

The exact cause of RA is unknown, but genetics, infections, or hormonal changes may play a role.

Disease-modifying medications can help slow the progression of RA. Other medications, combined with lifestyle changes, can help manage the effects and in turn improve your overall quality of life.

Skeletal system

One of the first signs of RA is inflammation of the smaller joints in the hands and feet. Most of the time, symptoms affect both sides of the body at once.

Common symptoms include pain, swelling, tenderness, and stiffness, which is more pronounced in the morning. Morning RA pain can last for 30 minutes or longer.

RA can also cause tingling or burning sensations in the joints. Symptoms can come and go in “flares” followed by a period of remission, but the initial stages can last at least six weeks.

Symptoms of RA can occur in any of the body’s joints, including your:

  • fingers
  • wrists
  • shoulders
  • elbows
  • hips
  • knees
  • ankles
  • toes

RA can also result in:

  • bunions
  • claw toes
  • hammer toes

As the disease progresses, cartilage and bone are damaged and destroyed. Eventually, supporting tendons, ligaments, and muscles weaken. This can lead to a limited range of motion or difficulty moving the joints properly. In the long term, joints can become deformed.

Having RA also puts you at greater risk of developing osteoporosis, a weakening of the bones. This in turn can increase your risk of bone fractures and breaks.

Chronic inflammation of the wrists can lead to carpal tunnel syndrome, making it difficult to use your wrists and hands. Weakened or damaged bones in the neck or cervical spine can cause chronic pain.

Circulatory system

RA can affect the system responsible for making and transporting blood throughout your body, too.

A simple blood test can reveal the presence of an antibody called the rheumatoid factor. Not all people with the antibody develop RA, but it’s one of many clues doctors use to diagnose this condition.

RA increases your risk for anemia. This is due to the decreased production of red blood cells. You may also have a higher risk of blocked or hardened arteries.

In rare cases, RA can lead to inflammation of the sac around the heart (pericarditis), the heart muscle (myocarditis), or even congestive heart failure.

A rare but serious complication of RA is inflammation of the blood vessels (rheumatoid vasculitis, or RA rash). Inflamed blood vessels weaken and expand or narrow, interfering with blood flow. This can lead to problems with the nerves, skin, heart, and brain.

Skin, eyes, and mouth

Rheumatoid nodules are hard lumps caused by inflammation that appear under the skin, usually near joints. They can be bothersome but usually aren’t painful.

As many as 4 million U.S. people have an inflammatory disease called Sjogren’s syndrome, according to the Sjogren’s Syndrome Foundation. About half of these individuals also have RA or a similar autoimmune disease. When the two diseases are present, it’s called secondary Sjogren’s syndrome.

Respiratory system

RA increases the risk of inflammation or scarring of the linings of the lungs (pleurisy) and damage to lung tissue (rheumatoid lung). Other problems include:

  • blocked airways (bronchiolitis obliterans)
  • fluid in the chest (pleural effusion)
  • high blood pressure in the lungs (pulmonary hypertension)
  • scarring of the lungs (pulmonary fibrosis)
  • rheumatoid nodules on the lungs

Other systems

The pain and discomfort of RA can make it difficult to sleep. RA may lead to extreme fatigue and a lack of energy. In some cases, RA flare-ups can cause flu-like symptoms such as:

  • short-term fever
  • sweating
  • lack of appetite

Early diagnosis and treatment may help slow the progression of RA. Disease-modifying medications, symptom relievers, and lifestyle changes can also greatly improve your quality of life.

Treatments FOR RA

Healthy joints are the “hinges” that let you move around. Many of us take that for granted. These simple movements aren’t always automatic or easy when you have RA, though. They can be painful.

The goals and treatments used by physical therapists and occupational therapists sometimes overlap, but there are some general differences.

Physical Therapy for Rheumatoid Arthritis

The goal of it is to keep you moving. It uses exercise and other methods to stimulate muscles, bones, and joints. The result is more strength, tone, and overall fitness.

Physical therapists understand the mechanics of bones, joints, and muscles working together, the problems that can happen, and what to do about them. It’s a good idea to work with a therapist, whether you’ve had RA for a long time, you’re newly diagnosed, and no matter how severe it is.

Exercise. This is the cornerstone of any physical therapy plan. It will match your ability and fitness level, and include flexibility, strength, and cardio

Heat or ice. Treating inflamed or painful joints with heat or ice packs helps some people feel better.

Massage. It can also help you feel better.

Motivation and encouragement. It’s a big plus to have a pro to cheer you on and push you to keep going.

Occupational Therapy for Rheumatoid Arthritis

This helps you stay independent. A therapist will check to see what you need help with. Then, he can teach you better or easier ways to accomplish those things.

If activities like dressing, cooking, or bathing become hard or painful, occupational therapists can recommend or provide solutions. Assistive devices are products or improvements that make common tasks easier.

www.youtube.com/watch?v=Yc-9dfem3lMom/watch?v=Yc-9dfem3lM

Rheumatoid Arthritis Diet

There is no specific diet for Rheumatoid Arthritis but it is suggested that the Paleo diet would be very good for Arthritis,sufferers

Eat food that fights inflammation.some of these are beans,Broccoli,Cherries,Citrus Fruits,

fish,Nuts,Ginger,Green Tea,Soy,Turmeric,Whole Grains

Thank you for your time, and comments, I do hope you found this post informative,

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Pride Mobility S74 GO-GO Scooter Review

4-Wheel Electric Mobility Scooter For Adults Pride Mobility S74 Go-Go Scooter
Pride Mobility S74 Go-Go Scooter Review -4-Wheel Electric Mobility Scooter For Adults

Sometimes some of us will want to put off using aids to assist us in our day to day activities because using these aids will make it seems we are losing our independence.

But Instead of losing your independence I believe it will enhance your independence.

If you have trouble walking for extended periods of time, experience difficulty managing a walker, cane or crutches, then a scooter may be for you.

Scooters are also helpful for people who use oxygen and need to conserve their energy.

Continue reading “Pride Mobility S74 GO-GO Scooter Review”

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Wellness Tips For Seniors——Maintaining Good Health

.

Tips for healthy living for seniors
Wellness tips for seniors

WellnessTips For Seniors

Taking care of the health needs that we seniors need to be concerned about can be an overwhelming task.

In this post, we will be looking at some things that we need to be on top of to be healthy and to stay healthy

It is said that people who had good healthy habits when they were younger tend to become healthy seniors, but it is never too late. To practice good healthy habits

Good health habits can make a difference even to seniors who are prone to illness or have not made their health a priority in the past.

Continue reading “Wellness Tips For Seniors——Maintaining Good Health”

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