Health And Wellness For Active Boomer

Wikipedia’s definition of wellness is

Well-being, well being, or wellness is the condition of an individual or group. A high level of well-being means that in some sense the individual’s or group’s condition is positive.

Wellness refers to diverse and interconnected dimensions of physical, mental, and social well-being that extend beyond the traditional definition of health. It includes choices and activities aimed at achieving physical vitality, mental alacrity, social satisfaction, a sense of accomplishment, and personal fulfillment

There eight dimensions to wellness, the five top ones are:

Emotional

Emotional wellness inspires  taking care of one’s self and this includes relaxation, stress reduction and the development of inner strength.( to be able to calmly deal with whatever life throws at us)

It is important to be attentive to our feelings whether they are positive and negative and be able to understand how to handle these emotions.

It is important that the ability to learn and grow from experiences. Emotional well-being encourages our independence  and decision-making skills. It is an important part of overall wellness.

 Financial 

Financial  Wellness knowing how to successfully manage financial expenses. Money plays a critical role in our lives and not having enough of it impacts not only  our health but our state of well being.

Financial stress is found to be a common source of stress, anxiety in many seniors.

Occupational wellness

appreciation in our ability to make a contribution.

This dimension of Occupational wellness is about enjoying your occupational endeavors keeping yourself occupied is very important to us seniors, it not only gives us a sense of usefulness but also a sense of wellness encourages a sense of  personal satisfaction that enriches one’s life through work.

Social wellness 

Social wellness helps you to  have a social network of people in your social circle and this   allows you to develop encouraging relationships with peers,

Physical wellness 

Physical wellness relates to maintaining a healthy body and being physical will help in your mobility, and will keep the effects of arthritis at bay.

Physical health is attained not only  through exercise, but eating well, getting enough sleep and paying attention to the signs of illness and getting help when needed.

Seniors health Issues

People in America today can expect to live longer than ever before. Once you make it to 65, the data suggest that you can live another 19.3 years, on average, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC)

The downside to this is as we age we are more prone to develop age-related diseases.

Some of the more common disease that seniors are more prone to affect seniors are.

Arthritis

Arthritis is probably the number one condition that people 65 or older contend with, says geriatrician Marie Bernard, MD,

The CDC estimates that it affects 49.7 percent of all adults over 65 and can lead to pain and lower quality of life for some seniors.

Although arthritis can discourage you from being active, it’s important to work with your doctor to develop a personalized activity plan that, along with other treatment, can help maintain senior health.

Heart Disease

According to the CDC, heart disease remains the leading killer of adults over age 65,

As a chronic condition, heart disease affects 37 percent of men and 26 percent of women 65 and older, according to the Federal Inter agency Forum on Aging-Related Statistics.

As people age, they’re increasingly living with risk factors, such as high blood pressure and high cholesterol, that increase the chances of having a stroke or developing heart disease.

Exercise, eat well, get a good night’s rest is a deterrent to Heart disease.

Eating well means eating in a fashion that will allow you to keep a healthy weight with a well-balanced and healthy diet.

 Cancer

Cancer is the second leading cause of death among people over age 65, . The CDC reports that 28 percent of men and 21 percent of women over age 65 are living with cancer.

If caught early through screenings, such as mammograms, colonoscopies, and skin checks, many types of cancer are treatable.

Cancer may not always be preventable, but you can improve your quality of life as a senior living with cancer, including during treatment, by working with your medical team and maintaining their healthy senior living recommendations.

Respiratory Diseases

, such as chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), are the third most common cause of death among people 65 and older

Among people 65 and older, about 10 percent of men and 13 percent of women are living with asthma, and 10 percent of men and 11 percent of women are living with chronic bronchitis or emphysema, according to the Federal Interagency Forum on Aging-Related Statistics.

Although having a chronic respiratory disease increases senior health risks, making you more vulnerable to pneumonia and other infections, getting lung function tests and taking the correct medication, or using oxygen as instructed, will go a long way toward preserving senior health and your quality of life.

Alzheimer’s Disease

The Alzheimer’s Association reports that one in nine people age 65 and older, which is about 11 percent, have Alzheimer’s disease, but because diagnosis is challenging, it’s difficult to know exactly how many people are living with this chronic condition.

Still, experts acknowledge that cognitive impairment has a significant impact on senior health across the spectrum, from issues of safety and self-care to the cost burden of care, either in the home or a residential facility

 Diabetes

The CDC estimates that 25 percent of people ages 65 and older are living with diabetes, a significant senior health risk.

According to CDC data, 54,161 adults over age 65 died from diabetes-related deaths in 2014. 

Diabetes can be identified and addressed early with simple blood tests for blood sugar levels.

The sooner you know that you have or are at risk for diabetes, the sooner you can start making changes to control the disease and improve your long-term senior health outlook

Falls

The risk for falls requiring emergency room care increases with age. Each year, 2.5 million people ages 65 and older are treated in emergency departments because of falls, according to the CDC.

That’s more than any other age group. And, one-third of people who go to the emergency room for a fall may find themselves there again within one year, according to a study published in August 2015 in the American Journal of Emergency Medicine.

Also, be aware that most falls occur in the home, where tripping hazards include area rugs and slippery bathroom floors, according to a study published in January 2013 in the Journal of Injury and Violence Research.

These are a few of the health problems that affect seniors 65 years and over

If these diseases become burdensome and affect their ability to care for themselves  then it is time to think of elderly care.

What is Elder Care?

Eldercare or senior care is  specialized care that is designed to meet the needs and requirements of senior citizens at various stages.

Senior care encompasses everything from assisted living and nursing care to adult daycare home care, and even hospice care.

Aging is not a reason to consider elder care, but unfortunately with aging usually comes  various diseases and physical limitations and because of these accompanying problems is the cause of discussion about eldercare

When is Elder Care Necessary?

Eldercare not always needed , in some cases, there are senior citizens that  never require any type of care to live independently in their later years.

However, elder care often becomes an issue when the elderly begins experiencing difficulty with activities of daily living (ADLs), both safely and independently. ADLs may include cooking, cleaning, shopping, dressing, bathing, driving, taking meds, etc.

The need for eldercare may also happen quickly, as is the case if one is recovering from a broken hip or recently had a stroke and is still suffering the cognitive and/or physical effects.

What is constant, however, is that eldercare may be needed when a health condition –whether physical, cognitive, or even emotional – hinders the ability to safely complete activities of daily living.

Warning Signs to Watch Out For

  • Things to look for in a elderly person are:Physical problems
    • Gait, stability (walking problems)
    • Sensory issues (a loss or decline in hearing, seeing, smelling)
    • Chronic health conditions (diabetes, heart disease, arthritis)
    • Temporary or permanent physical limitations that may inhibit the senior’s ability to perform ADLs

Thanks for reading this post, I hope you found it helpful, please remember to share and do come again.

NOTE:  This post includes affiliate links, which, if clicked on and a product purchased, I get a small commission (with no increase in cost to you).

Please follow and like us:
error0

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *